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Papers and Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight General Meeting of the American Association : Held at Narragansett Pier, R. I., June 29 July 6, 1906 (Classic Reprint) pdf

Papers and Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight General Meeting of the American Association : Held at Narragansett Pier, R. I., June 29 July 6, 1906 (Classic Reprint) pdf

Papers and Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight General Meeting of the American Association : Held at Narragansett Pier, R. I., June 29 July 6, 1906 (Classic Reprint) by Unknown Author

Papers and Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight General Meeting of the American Association : Held at Narragansett Pier, R. I., June 29 July 6, 1906 (Classic Reprint)
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Author: Unknown Author
Number of Pages: 316 pages
Published Date: 27 Sep 2015
Publisher: Forgotten Books
Publication Country: United States
Language: English
Type: Pdf
ISBN: 9781332026784
File size: 8 Mb
File Name: Papers.and.Proceedings.of.the.Twenty-Eight.General.Meeting.of.the.American.Association.Held.at.Narragansett.Pier,.R..I.,.June.29.July.6,.1906.(Classic.Reprint).pdf
Download Link: Papers and Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight General Meeting of the American Association Held at Narragansett Pier, R. I., June 29 July 6, 1906 (Classic Reprint)
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Excerpt from Papers and Proceedings of the Twenty-Eight General Meeting of the American Association: Held at Narragansett Pier, R. I., June 29 July 6, 1906 The present-day librarian has taken on duties formerly borne by the trustees, and through force of circumstances rather than inclination, he is obliged to devote much of his time and attention to the business management of the institution. The increase in the appropriations made to libraries, and the amount of work which an up-to-date library is expected to perform, have made it necessary for a librarian to become more of a business manager than his predecessor. He must see that the income of the library is wisely and economically expended, and that the needs of the institution are so represented to trustees and the city officials as to secure sufficient money to carry on the work. He must keep in contact with the busy workers and professional men of the community, so that he may be prompt in seizing every opportunity for extending the usefulness of the library. Trustees have realized that better results are obtained when the librarian is really the active executive head. They expect him to make recommendations, and after they, as a legislative body, have accepted and adopted them, to see that they are carried into execution. The spirit of expansion and progress which has characterized the age has been caught by the library profession. By the formation of the American Library Association the librarians who constituted that association were banded together for aggressive work, and it is because of the unity of their action and the earnestness of their purpose that so much his been accomplished in the short space of thirty years. As a result of the interchange of ideas which these conferences have encouraged, those who have been most progressive in the profession have been able to influence their more conservative co-workers to reach oat and extend their field of operation. Experiments tried in one place with success have been adopted elsewhere. We have worked to secure the establishment of libraries upon a sound basis. Laws providing for their maintenance have been enacted in one state after another. Organized aid for towns and cities wishing to establish libraries has been provided. The arranging and cataloging of books has become a science. All of these things and many others the American Library Association has accomplished through committees and individuals. "The library movement," says a recent report, "has now reached a stage in its development at which it would seem that present methods may be modified, with great gain in efficiency, and a relatively diminished expenditure." The early workers in the modem library movement saw the desirability of a unification of library interests and methods, and did all they could to secure that end. Before much more can be done, organization must extend to the association itself. It is to be hoped that the American Library Association committee on ways and means will report such a sum of money on hand for the purpose of establishing permanent headquarters as will justify the Association in making a start in this direction, even if it be of the humblest character. In these days system and organization are indispensable in library management. The labor saving devices which have been invented for the modern nun of affairs have not resulted in giving him more leisure, but have been designed to make it possible for him to accomplish more work in a given time. The librarian has studied business methods only that he, like the business man, may save time in one direction to expend it in another. The library which is not well organized will meet the same fate as the commercial house which has an incompetent bead. Not only libraries, but other educational institutions and systems have been established on such a large scale that it has been necessary to adopt modem methods so that.

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